ABC 33/40 Weather Blog

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The latest information on Alabama weather, tornadoes, hurricanes, winter storms, national weather headlines and the science of meteorology in general.
Updated: 6 min 23 sec ago

Weather Apps And Other Things

5 hours 42 min ago

I think most of you know by now the “James Spann 24/7″ weather app is in the process of being replaced by a new app that will be offered by ABC 33/40; this will have all the functionality of the old app, along with our news and sports content. Basically a “one stop shop” so you don’t have to have multiple apps on your phone or tablet.

The new app is not available yet, but hopefully it will hit the app stores within the next 7 days. Of course, it will be free.

I was very excited to offer the “James Spann 24/7″ app since it was all human powered. Real weather discussion written by real meteorologists that explain the weather. It basically offered all of my products and services on one place. These blog posts, the Weather Xtreme video, WeatherBrains, and much more. All of these elements will be in the new app… thanks for your patience.

Some so many of you are asking about weather sources, apps, etc these days… here are some thoughts that might help.

WEATHER INFORMATION IS A COMMODITY: You can get a weather forecast anywhere these days. I have seen weather forecasts on everything from furniture store apps to political candidate web sites. Weather apps by the thousands are available on your “app store”, and most of them don’t cost a dime. While this sounds great, the problem is accuracy and dependability.

The stock weather app on your phone, and almost all other weather apps and web sites, generate automated forecasts using raw computer “model output statistics”. Not one professional meteorologist (and, in most cases, not one human) reviews the forecasts before they are made available. And, boy, can these automated forecasts steer you wrong.

Here is a screen grab from a weather app yesterday…

And, most of these “forecasts” show a nice little icon of the weather (sun, storm, clouds, etc), and three numbers. High, low, and “probability of precipitation”. While this works on some days, on really active weather days it is of no help. You have no idea if there is a severe weather threat, the amount of rain or precipitation expected, timing, and placement.

Many of you know our frustration, and we often call these “crap apps”. Trust me, I fully understand very few people wait on the television news to come on to get a weather update, and I am delighted to offer round the clock weather products at your convenience. No, I don’t get much sleep, but it is a delight to be able to offer weather products and services at all hours of the day and night since that is my passion in life.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR: You need to get weather information from a source that offers content put together by a real meteorologist, that understands the people, culture, and geography of your home state. A written discussion that goes beyond the little cartoon pictures of weather, that is updated frequently. And, preferably a video that explains what to expect and doesn’t treat you like an idiot. If you app features videos that tell you to go into an air conditioned room during hot weather, you might look elsewhere.

RECOMMENDED SOURCES/APPS: So, what apps do I need? Which ones are reliable? Here are some suggestions…

THIS BLOG: If you are reading this, then we are preaching to the choir. The Alabamawx.com blog is unique, and a strong source for Alabama weather information. Yes, we get it wrong sometimes. But, our short term (48 hour) accuracy is in the 92-95 percent category. And, when I miss the big one, I am open and honest.

There are seven meteorologists who write here, with over 100 years combined weather experience in Alabama. The Weather Xtreme video is posted twice daily weekdays, and once daily weekends.

If you live outside Alabama…. do your best to find a similar source.

ABC 33/40 APP: When the new version is released, you should be able to get all of our human powered weather information there, including blog posts and the Weather Xtreme video. It will be free, and available on iOS and Android. I will let you know when it is released into the wild.

WARNING APPS: Getting severe weather warnings is extremely important. Yes, the built in “WEA”… or wireless emergency alert system seems to work well for flash flood and tornado warnings, but we really don’t know how that works, and we really don’t know the reliability. My favorite warnings apps are “WeatherRadio by WDT”, and “MyWarn”. I have no financial interest in either app, and they both work very well. Your generic, free weather app won’t do this well.

RADAR APP: RadarScope is the winner by far. They offer a version for iOS, Android, and OS X (Apple computers). And, you can get radar with this on your Apple Watch. And yes, I love it. And, over on the Windows side, the Gibson Ridge radar software is excellent.

LIGHTNING APP: I use BoltMeter, but for some reason that is not available now within the US app stores. I have purchased the lightning add-on within “WeatherRadio by WDT” which offers real time lightning data, and alerts are well. This is a critical function for outdoor events, especially on summer afternoons. RadarScope offers real time lightning data as well for a small price.

Have suggestions? List them in the comment section.

The one thing I try and do is be available to answer your weather questions. I don’t have a 15 minute chat session we advertise on TV… I am around most hours of the day and night. Best way of getting me is social media…

Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
Instagram

My personal email is here… and I respond quickly. The only thing I don’t do is a phone call; I have not answered my work phone since 1998. Too much time consumption.

Your pictures and reports are so helpful, and I thank all for engaging with me in the new digital world. And again, I will let you know the minute the new ABC 33/40 app is available…

Categories: Weather

Trending Hotter and Drier

6 hours 29 min ago

RADAR CHECK: The weather is pretty quiet at daybreak across Alabama; we note just a few small, isolated showers over the northeast counties of the state. Temperatures are mostly in the 67-72 degree range.

THE DAY AHEAD: We will still mention the risk of a few scattered showers or storms this afternoon and early tonight, but they will be fewer in number as an upper ridge begins to build across the Deep South. The high will be in the mid to upper 80s… it is very interesting to note that Birmingham has failed to reach 90 degrees so far during the month of July. The last time we had a high of 90 or higher was back on June 29, when the high was 91. This will be the the seventh consecutive day with a high only in the 80s.

We do note SPC has parts of West and South Alabama under a “marginal” risk of severe storms later today; where they do form the storms could be pretty strong in that part of the state.

RES OF THE WEEK: The upper ridge will continue to slowly build, meaning the northwest flow pattern that brought the enhanced rain coverage is gone for a while. Expect partly sunny days with a few isolated afternoon storms, but many places will have a chance to dry out. And, we heat up… a good chance we do see 90 degree heat tomorrow, with low 90s likely Wednesday through Friday.

The chance of any one spot getting wet each day will be in the 20-30 percent range, and most of the showers and storms will come during the afternoon and evening hours.

THE ALABAMA WEEKEND: The weekend looks very routine for mid-July in Alabama…. partly sunny, hot, humid days with the risk of “scattered, mostly afternoon and evening showers and thunderstorms. Highs in the 91-94 degree range.

NEXT WEEK: The GFS suggests the upper trough over the eastern U.S. will become established again, with the heat ridge moving back to the west. This means next week should be wetter and not as hot… see the Weather Xtreme video for maps, graphics, and more details.

GULF COAST WEATHER: Looks good this week with about 6 to 8 hours of sunshine daily from Panama City Beach west to Gulf Shores, and the usual risk of a passing storm from time to time. Highs on the immediate coast will be in the mid to upper 80s, with low 90s inland. The sea water temperature this morning at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab has dropped to 79 degrees.

TROPICS: Very quiet across the Atlantic basin with very dry air in many regions, and tropical storm formation is not expected this week. Most of the action is over in the western Pacific.

WEATHER BRAINS: Don’t forget you can listen to our weekly 90 minute netcast anytime on the web, or on iTunes. This is the show all about weather featuring many familiar voices, including our meteorologists here at ABC 33/40. We will produce this week’s show tonight at 8:30 CT… you can watch it on “James Spann 24/7″ on cable systems around the state, or on the web here.

CONNECT: You can find me on all of the major social networks…

Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
Instagram

Look for the next Weather Xtreme video here by 4:00 this afternoon… enjoy the day!

Categories: Weather

More Storms Expected

Sun, 07/05/2015 - 06:59

A quick look at the radar this morning showed much of the action occurring across South Alabama where the boundary sagged last night. The flash flood watch issued yesterday was allowed to expire this morning. Additional showers are expected to develop later today in the warmth of the afternoon.

At 500 millibars, the small upper low was located over the eastern half of Tennessee as it slowly migrates northeastward reducing its influence on our weather pattern. As the low gets absorbed into the primary westerly flow and moves into the Mid-Atlantic States, the pattern across the Southeast US will be replaced by gradual ridging as the Bermuda high builds across the southern US from the western Atlantic. This upper air pattern should favor a return to more diurnally driven showers and storms for the week ahead as temperatures also climb back into the lower 90s.

With the westerlies located along the northern tier of the US, another cold front will approach the Ohio and Tennessee River valleys at mid-week but is expected to wash out before we can see any kind of air mass change. This keep the moist air mass in place and keeps scattered showers and storms in the forecast for much of the week ahead.

The Atlantic Basin remains especially quiet as the South Atlantic remains covered by a large mass of dry Saharan air. There was a little more action in the Eastern Pacific where a tropical depression is likely to form early next week well out in the Pacific.

The SPC in Norman, OK, has continued a marginal risk of severe storms along the Gulf and Southeast US coasts for today with an enhanced risk of severe storms centered mainly on South Dakota later in the day. They have only a marginal risk area ahead of that front for Monday or Day 2.

Headed to the beach? About 6 to 8 hours of sunshine daily for the Central Gulf Coast heading into next week, from Dauphin Island to Panama City Beach. Storms will be more numerous today, but each day in the week ahead there will be a decent chance for a passing storm from time to time, fairly typical with the daily sea breeze effect. Highs on the immediate coast will remain in the mid to upper 80s, with lower 90s inland. Sea water yesterday afternoon at Perdido Pass at Orange Beach was reported to be 81 degrees.

Looking out into voodoo country, the GFS continues to advertise the potential for the trough to stay a feature across the eastern US into Week 2. While the ridge builds and decays, the presence of the overall trough across the eastern third of the country is certainly a positive sign for keeping any extreme heat at bay.

James Spann will be back with the next edition of the Weather Xtreme Video first thing on Monday morning. Check back here often for updates on the Central Alabama weather.

-Brian-

Categories: Weather

Severe Thunderstorm Warning for Elmore and Tallapoosa County

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 17:24

Strong thunderstorms over the Montgomery area are moving east northeast.

Areas from Wetumpka to Eclectic to Tallassee are in the path of the storm. Parts of southern Lake will also be impacted.

Eastern Montgomery is also being impacted by very strong storms as well.

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN BIRMINGHAM HAS ISSUED A

* SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING FOR…
SOUTH CENTRAL TALLAPOOSA COUNTY IN EAST CENTRAL ALABAMA…
CENTRAL ELMORE COUNTY IN EAST CENTRAL ALABAMA…

* UNTIL 600 PM CDT

* AT 523 PM CDT…A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WAS LOCATED OVER BLUE
RIDGE…OR OVER WETUMPKA…MOVING EAST AT 35 MPH.

HAZARD…60 MPH WIND GUSTS.

SOURCE…RADAR INDICATED.

IMPACT…EXPECT DAMAGE TO ROOFS…SIDING AND TREES.

* LOCATIONS IMPACTED INCLUDE…
WETUMPKA…TALLASSEE…ECLECTIC…MARTIN DAM…EMERALD MOUNTAIN…
BLUE RIDGE…TALLAPOOSA CITY…SANTUCK…REEVES AIRPORT…WESTERN
LAKE MARTIN…YATES RESERVOIR…CLAUD…WALLSBORO…WARE AND YATES
DAM.

Categories: Weather

Afternoon Update

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 14:05

After the very active start to the day, we have see a lull in the action and actually have see some decent sunshine across portions of the state. The breaks in the cloud cover, as seen below, are allowing instability to build and we are once again seeing convection blossom across portions of the Southeast.

Under these puffy white clouds, we are seeing numerous showers and storms. These storms are producing a lot of lightning, gusty winds, intense rainfall, and possibly even some hail. A quick look at the radar shows a cluster of storms over West Alabama and they are tracking towards the east. It looks as though the bulk of the activity will be staying just to the south of Interstate 20 corridor.

Click image to enlarge.

For the rest of today we will continue to see showers and storms develop across Central Alabama and these could affect some of those fireworks shows, but hopefully we will see enough breaks in the action that will allow the shows to go on. Heading into Sunday, expect more of the same across the state. A stall frontal boundary to our north, and a warm and moist air mass will allow for numerous showers and storms to develop once again tomorrow. These storms will produce loads of lightning, but flooding could be the greatest concern. A reminder, much of Central Alabama remains under a flash flood watch through Sunday morning.

Categories: Weather

Watch May Be Issued

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 11:46

AREAS AFFECTED…PORTIONS OF CENTRAL/SRN MS…EXTREME W-CENTRAL AL

CONCERNING…SEVERE POTENTIAL…WATCH POSSIBLE

PROBABILITY OF WATCH ISSUANCE…40 PERCENT

SUMMARY…THUNDERSTORMS MAY POSE A RISK FOR ISOLATED DAMAGING GUSTS
THROUGH MID AFTERNOON. TRENDS IN THUNDERSTORM COVERAGE WILL BE
MONITORED AND A WATCH IS POSSIBLE PRIOR TO 18Z.

DISCUSSION…LATEST RADAR AND VISIBLE SATELLITE IMAGERY SHOW AN
EAST-WEST ORIENTED OUTFLOW BOUNDARY BISECTING THE STATE OF
MISSISSIPPI…WITH RECENT MOTION TO THE SOUTH AT AROUND 10 MPH. A
WEAKENING UPPER LEVEL SHORTWAVE TROUGH WAS LOCATED ACROSS THE
LOWER/MID MISSISSIPPI RIVER VALLEY. THUNDERSTORMS WERE SLOWLY
INTENSIFYING ALONG THE LEADING EDGE OF A CONVECTIVELY-GENERATED COLD
POOL OVER WEST-CENTRAL MS…AND ALSO IN THE VICINITY OF THE E-W
BOUNDARY FROM NEAR JACKSON TO JUST NORTH OF MERIDIAN. AMPLE HEATING
OF THE MOIST AIR MASS SOUTH OF THE OUTFLOW BOUNDARY WILL RESULT IN A
MODERATE/STRONG SURFACE-BASED INSTABILITY…AND 25-35 KTS OF WSW
FLOW IN THE 2-4 KM AGL LAYER IS FAVORABLY ALIGNED WITH OVERALL STORM
MOTIONS. A RISK FOR DAMAGING WINDS WILL EXIST THROUGH THIS AFTERNOON
WITH THE EASTWARD-MOVING LINE OF THUNDERSTORMS GENERALLY NEAR AND
SOUTH OF THE I-20 CORRIDOR…AND AN ISOLATED THREAT WILL EXIST WITH
THE STRONGER STORMS DEVELOPING FARTHER EAST INTO EAST-CENTRAL MS/FAR
W-CENTRAL AL.

RADAR TRENDS WILL BE MONITORED AND A WW IS POSSIBLE PRIOR TO 18Z.

Categories: Weather

Cool Pic of the Day

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 10:16

Here is a cool graphic of the current visible satellite image with radar echoes superimposed.

That delineated line is the outflow sinking south.

You can see clearing out behind it. The southward impetus of the outflow and the low level southerly surface winds are blowing off the tops of the clouds, resulting in the striations.

Additional storms are already firing back in western Mississippi, Louisiana and Arkansas. They are the result of another wind maximum moving through the upper trough just to our northwest that results in diffluence or spreading apart aloft, which creates lift at the surface!

Categories: Weather

Flooding Scenes from Shades Creek

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 09:36

Serious flooding continues across parts of the Birmingham Metro despite the fact that the rain has ended.

these photos are from the Mountain Brook Parkway, courtesy of @Davi29P who apparently lives in the Old Mill House.

Click to enlarge montage

Water rescues have been ongoing at the Rue Maison and Rue Deville apartments on Shades Creek at Lakeshore and Green Springs.

Categories: Weather

Record Rainfall for the Date

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 08:33

3.12 inches of rain has fallen at the Birmingham Airport so far today through 8:15 a.m.

This is a new record rainfall for July 4th in the Magic City.

The former record (2.10″) was recorded in the first year we have reliable records, 1895!

That same year, the high was only 80F. We might not see 80F today. It we stay at 76F or cooler, it will tie or beat the record cool high for Independence Day. A few breaks in the clouds should prevent that from happening, but it could be a top ten coolest Fourth of July at Birmingham. And it certainly is the wettest!

Categories: Weather

Will It Rain All Day?

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 08:21

The answer is…no.

Almost everyone will see rain today, but there will be breaks.

The current band of rain covering nearly all of North Central Alabama is beginning to slowly diminish at this hour. It should end over western Alabama by 10 a.m. and in the Birmingham area by noon.

Locations along and east of I-65 should see a 2-4 hour break in the rain through early afternoon.

But additional rain and storms will move into and form over western Alabama starting around noon, and this activity will work its way across the area through the afternoon with most folks seeing another 2-3 hours of rain.

Based on the HRRR model, which we are depicting above in a 15 hour loop, the rain should start again in Birmingham around mid-afternoon and last 2-3 hours. Then there could be a nice break for several hours, perhaps allowing Thunder on the Mountain and other fireworks displays to go off without any rain problems.

None of this is poured in concrete and is based on model data, so stay tuned.

LATE NOTE
3.12 inches at Birmingham Airport so far today through 8:15 a.m. This is a new record rainfall for July 4th in the Magic City. The former record (2.10″0 was recorded in the first year we have reliable records, 1895!

Categories: Weather

Serious Situation in Birmingham Metro

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 08:04

A serious flash flooding situation is in effect in the Birmingham Metro.

John Talbot reports that Homewood Police and Fire have a major water rescue/evacuation in progress at apartments off Lakeshore Dr.

Birmingham Fire and Rescue also performing water rescues.

Please, on this Fourth of July, turn around, don’t drown! Don’t put first responders and your family in jeopardy by driving into flood waters.

Here is the current radar:

More heavy rain continues across southern parts of the Birmingham Metro at this hour. The heaviest rain is in the I-459 corridor around Hoover up to Liberty Park. Thunderstorms have really increased in that area with lots of lightning and booming thunder. I have picked up 2.32 inches of rain since midnight in Vestavia off Acton Road.

Rain is slowing over the City of Birmingham, which is good news, but serious flash flooding continues.

Categories: Weather

Village Creek Situation

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 07:31

LATE REPORT
Village Creek now at 10.93 feet and still rising.

ORIGINAL POST
You can see from this flood gauge graphic how rapidly the water has risen on Village Creek in western Birmingham.

Additional very heavy rain is falling in this area still and the flooding is expected to worsen.

Here is what flooding looks like at 11 feet from an experimental graphic from the NWS Birmingham.

Categories: Weather

Flash Flood Warning for Northern Shelby County

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 07:31

Very heavy rain is sinking south slowly across northern Shelby County this morning.

1-3 inches of rain has fallen and one hour rainfall rates over one inch can be expected.

Flooding will occur in areas that are prone to it.

Current radar at 7:42 on the left, accumulated precipitation on the right:

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN BIRMINGHAM HAS ISSUED A

* FLASH FLOOD WARNING FOR…
NORTHEASTERN SHELBY COUNTY IN CENTRAL ALABAMA…

* UNTIL 1030 AM CDT

* AT 729 AM CDT…DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED A THUNDERSTORM PRODUCING
HEAVY RAIN ACROSS THE WARNED AREA. UP TO THREE INCHES OF RAIN HAVE
ALREADY FALLEN. FLASH FLOODING IS EXPECTED TO BEGIN SHORTLY.

* SOME LOCATIONS THAT WILL EXPERIENCE FLOODING INCLUDE…
HOOVER…LEEDS…CHELSEA…INDIAN SPRINGS VILLAGE…VINCENT…
HARPERSVILLE…WESTOVER…MOUNT LAUREL…VANDIVER…LAKE PURDY…
GREYSTONE…BROOK HIGHLAND…MEADOWBROOK…FOWLER LAKE…HIGHLAND
LAKES…OAK MOUNTAIN STATE PARK…SHOAL CREEK…HOOVER VETERANS
PARK AND STERRETT.

ADDITIONAL RAINFALL OF 1 TO 3 INCHES IS POSSIBLE IN THE WARNED AREA.

Categories: Weather

Soggy Fourth of July

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 07:15

Nature is providing plenty of fireworks for the fourth of July in the form of a train of thunderstorms that stretched from Southeast Oklahoma all the way to North Georgia. Flash flood watches were posted for a sizable chunk of the Southeast US including much of the northern half of Alabama through Sunday morning. There is little change likely to occur in this weather pattern over the next 36 to 48 hours, with potential for the watch area to be extended and additional flash flood warnings added for counties generally along and north of the Interstate 20 corridor. Rain and clouds were keeping temperatures down considerably with highs only expected to reach the lower 80s. Birmingham only reached 80 yesterday for the daily high. This is a look at the latest radar image.

The storm total precipitation estimate also shows the impact of the training of these storms with that red area in Marion County with an estimated 8 to 10 inches of rainfall with more to come.

The upper level low will move slowly into the Central Appalachians by Monday, so I expect rainy weather to stay with us into Sunday. But by Monday as the low gets caught up by the main westerlies, we should see the atmosphere dry out at least somewhat dropping us back to more typical afternoon and early evening storms for much of the week ahead. Again, the additional clouds and presence of showers will help to hold the heat off until mid-week when we should see highs once again near seasonal values as we record values into the lower 90s.

The training of echoes today and Sunday will keep the flash flood threat high across much of Central Alabama. Additional rainfall values of 2 to 4 inches will be possible over the weekend with some higher values likely where the strongest storms occur. Remember, turn around, don’t drown. Don’t risk your life by driving into areas where water covers the roads to an unknown depth.

While the flash flood threat is very high, we also continue to see potential for isolated strong to severe storms. SPC has much of the Southeast US in the area from North Georgia westward to Oklahoma in a marginal risk area. But as the upper low moves out early next week, the risk for strong storms should drop.

The Atlantic Basic continues to be quiet thanks to the extensive area of dry air over the South Atlantic. The Eastern Pacific was a little more active with a couple of areas of disturbed weather but no named storms for now.

For folks headed to the beach, look for about 4 to 7 hours of sunshine each day through much of next week with the risk of occasional passing thunderstorms from Dauphin Island eastward to Panama City Beach. Highs will remain in the mid to upper 80s on the immediate coast, with lower 90s inland. Sea water temperatures are mostly in the low to mid 80s.

Looking out into Week 2, the long range GFS suggests another substantial ridge to our west which will bring back highs in the 90s, but the pattern evolves back to more of a trough over the eastern US by the 19th of July suggesting at least a limit to some of the summer heat.

The overall weather situation for Central Alabama remains highly fluid, so please check back here often for updates. A flash flood warning was issued for Jefferson County until 9:30 am while I was working on this post. I plan to have the next Weather Xtreme Video posted here Sunday morning.

-Brian-

Categories: Weather

Flash Flood Warning for Jefferson/Metro Birmingham

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 06:30

LATE REPORT 7 AM
2.73 inches of rain at the Birmingham Airport in the past 24 hours, which 2.68 inches of it coming since 3:40 a.m.

Village Creek at Avenue W in Ensley (10.65′) has gone above its flood stage of 10 feet. More heavy rain is moving into the area and the creek will continue to rise.

ORIGINAL POST
Heavy rain continues this morning across North Central Alabama and flash flooding is becoming a real threat.

2-3 inches of rain has fallen across western Jefferson County from Sylvan Springs and Rock Creek to Downtown Birmingham.

Village Creek in Ensley is rising rapidly and will reach a moderate flood stage or higher. Currently forecast to reach 12.5 feet and could be higher if more rain develops to the west and moves in as expected.

Remember…turn around, don’t drown!

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN BIRMINGHAM HAS ISSUED A

* FLASH FLOOD WARNING FOR…
JEFFERSON COUNTY IN CENTRAL ALABAMA…

* UNTIL 930 AM CDT

* AT 629 AM CDT…DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED A THUNDERSTORM PRODUCING
HEAVY RAIN ACROSS THE WARNED AREA. UP TO THREE INCHES OF RAIN HAVE
ALREADY FALLEN. FLASH FLOODING IS EXPECTED TO BEGIN SHORTLY.

* SOME LOCATIONS THAT WILL EXPERIENCE FLOODING INCLUDE…
BIRMINGHAM…HOOVER…VESTAVIA HILLS…BESSEMER…HOMEWOOD…
MOUNTAIN BROOK…TRUSSVILLE…HUEYTOWN…GARDENDALE…IRONDALE…
LEEDS…MOODY…FAIRFIELD…FULTONDALE…SUMITON…CENTER POINT…
PLEASANT GROVE…CLAY…PINSON AND TARRANT.

ADDITIONAL RAINFALL OF 2 TO 4 INCHES POSSIBLE IN THE WARNED AREA.

Categories: Weather

Flash Flood Warning for West Central Alabama

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 04:12

LATE REPORT 7 AM
Lamar County EMA reports several roads under at least 6 inches of water across Lamar county including in the city of Vernon and at least three roads in the western part of the county.

ORIGINAL POST
Widespread 3-5 inch rainfall amounts have fallen across the warning area since yesterday and more heavy rainfall is occurring.

Here is a Doppler Radar estimation of rainfall amounts:

Flash flooding is a very real possibility across a widespread area.

Remember, turn around, don’t drown!

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN BIRMINGHAM HAS ISSUED A

* FLASH FLOOD WARNING FOR…
LAMAR COUNTY IN WEST CENTRAL ALABAMA…
MARION COUNTY IN NORTHWESTERN ALABAMA…
WALKER COUNTY IN CENTRAL ALABAMA…
WINSTON COUNTY IN NORTHWESTERN ALABAMA…
FAYETTE COUNTY IN WEST CENTRAL ALABAMA…

* UNTIL 1015 AM CDT SATURDAY

* AT 409 AM CDT…DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED THUNDERSTORMS PRODUCING
HEAVY RAIN ACROSS THE WARNED AREA. BETWEEN THREE TO SIX INCHES OF
RAIN HAVE ALREADY FALLEN. FLASH FLOODING IS EXPECTED TO BEGIN
SHORTLY.

* SOME LOCATIONS THAT WILL EXPERIENCE FLOODING INCLUDE…
JASPER…HAMILTON…WINFIELD…FAYETTE…HALEYVILLE…SUMITON…
CORDOVA…DORA…CARBON HILL…VERNON…SULLIGENT…MILLPORT…
LYNN…ARLEY…GUIN…HACKLEBURG…BERRY…DOUBLE SPRINGS…PARRISH
AND BRILLIANT.

ADDITIONAL RAINFALL AMOUNTS OF TWO FOUR WITH LOCALLY HIGHER
TOTALS ARE POSSIBLE IN THE WARNED AREA THROUGH THE MORNING.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

MOVE TO HIGHER GROUND NOW. ACT QUICKLY TO PROTECT YOUR LIFE.

Categories: Weather

Severe Thunderstorm Warning – Randolph/Chambers

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 00:14

Here is the big picture as of 12:15 along with a new warning.

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN BIRMINGHAM HAS ISSUED A

* SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING FOR…
SOUTHERN RANDOLPH COUNTY IN EAST CENTRAL ALABAMA…
CHAMBERS COUNTY IN EAST CENTRAL ALABAMA…

* UNTIL 100 AM CDT

* AT 1213 AM CDT…SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS WERE LOCATED ALONG A LINE
EXTENDING FROM NEAR MALONE TO NEAR SPARKLING SPRINGS TO NEAR
STURKIE…MOVING EAST AT 60 MPH.

HAZARD…60 MPH WIND GUSTS.

SOURCE…RADAR INDICATED.

IMPACT…EXPECT DAMAGE TO ROOFS…SIDING AND TREES.

* LOCATIONS IMPACTED INCLUDE…
VALLEY…LANETT…ROANOKE…LAFAYETTE…STROUD…LA FAYETTE…
WADLEY…RED LEVEL…LAKEVIEW…WEST CHAMBERS…WELCH…CRYSTAL
LAKE…RIDGE GROVE…PENTON…HUGULEY…TRAMMEL CROSSROADS…
CHAMBERS COUNTY LAKE…POST OAK FORKS…STANDING ROCK AND DENSON.

Categories: Weather

Severe Thunderstorm Warning Coosa/Tallapoosa

Fri, 07/03/2015 - 23:30

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN BIRMINGHAM HAS ISSUED A

* SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING FOR…
COOSA COUNTY IN EAST CENTRAL ALABAMA…
TALLAPOOSA COUNTY IN EAST CENTRAL ALABAMA…

* UNTIL 1230 AM CDT

* AT 1129 PM CDT…SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS WERE LOCATED ALONG A LINE
EXTENDING FROM STEWARTVILLE TO NEAR BENTLEYVILLE TO NEAR WELONA…
MOVING EAST AT 50 MPH.

HAZARD…60 MPH WIND GUSTS.

SOURCE…RADAR INDICATED.

IMPACT…EXPECT DAMAGE TO ROOFS…SIDING AND TREES.

* LOCATIONS IMPACTED INCLUDE…
ALEXANDER CITY…DADEVILLE…GOODWATER…CAMP HILL…ROCKFORD…
KELLYTON…WEOGUFKA…STEWARTVILLE…EQUALITY…JACKSONS’ GAP…NEW
SITE…GOLDVILLE…LYLE…WESTERN LAKE MARTIN…UNITY…
PENTONVILLE…HATCHET…EASTERN LAKE MARTIN…MORIAH AND HILLABEE CREEK.

Categories: Weather

More Showers/Storms

Fri, 07/03/2015 - 22:59

Another round of showers and thunderstorms is moving across much of the same area that experienced a couple of rounds of storms this afternoon.

Showers and storms extend from the Alabaster area down through Calera, Maplesville and Marion.

Other storms have formed ahead of this main activity along US_80 from Demopolis to Selma and Montgomery.

Lots of lightning, gusty winds and heavy rain, but the storms are not expected to become severe.

Showers and storms are expected to be common through the morning hours in about the same areas.

Categories: Weather

Update on the Storms

Fri, 07/03/2015 - 20:00

Four areas of storms to worry about tonight:

1. Chilton County storms are quite strong, but not severe. Lots of lightning and heavy rain as well as gusty winds. They are straddling I-65 around Lomax and Clanton. They will be approaching Lake Mitchell shortly.

2. Montgomery Area: strong storms with lots of lightning in the Montgomery area.

3. West Central Alabama: A couple of isolated strong storms are over northwestern Tuscaloosa County and northwestern Greene County. The Tuscaloosa storm will affect areas well north of the City of Tuscaloosa, the University of Alabama and Northport, mainly affecting rural areas near and around Moores Bridge Samanatha as it moves east southeast. This storm will stay just north of Lake Tuscaloosa. The Greene County storm will cross I-59 around Eutaw and Knoxille before 8:15.

4. Approaching Pickens and Lamar Counties: Strong to severe storms in eastern Mississippi from Amory to Aberdeen to West Point will be reaching West Alabama’s Lamar and northern Pickens Counties starting around 815 p.m. The storms should reach Vernon before 8:30 and Millport before 8:45.

The storms are not severe at this time, but have the potential to become severe thanks do some fairly significant wind shear for summer. All of the storms will be capable of deadly lightning, very heavy rain and strong gusty winds.

The polygons in peach are Significant Weather Alerts from the NWS.

Categories: Weather